Submit your ideas for how to improve and simplify interactions between small businesses and government in NYC by 9/26!
nycbizsolutions:

Last month, the de Blasio Administration announced Small Business First, a new initiative led by the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations. In coordination with multiple City agencies, this initiative seeks to simplify the City’s regulatory climate and make it easier for businesses to interact with government. Building upon previous reforms, the initiative seeks to make changes that will assist businesses by:
Providing better information about government requirements and how to comply
Simplifying rules and compliance processes to reduce violations
Ensuring enforcement focuses on promoting compliance through education and flexibility
Easing the process for correction and adjudication of violations
Engaging underserved communities to better deliver services
Mayor de Blasio has tasked the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations with developing recommendations by working with City agencies, community stakeholders and soliciting input from businesses across the five boroughs.
Submit your ideas and recommendations by Friday, September 26 »

Submit your ideas for how to improve and simplify interactions between small businesses and government in NYC by 9/26!

nycbizsolutions:

Last month, the de Blasio Administration announced Small Business First, a new initiative led by the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations. In coordination with multiple City agencies, this initiative seeks to simplify the City’s regulatory climate and make it easier for businesses to interact with government. Building upon previous reforms, the initiative seeks to make changes that will assist businesses by:

  • Providing better information about government requirements and how to comply
  • Simplifying rules and compliance processes to reduce violations
  • Ensuring enforcement focuses on promoting compliance through education and flexibility
  • Easing the process for correction and adjudication of violations
  • Engaging underserved communities to better deliver services

Mayor de Blasio has tasked the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations with developing recommendations by working with City agencies, community stakeholders and soliciting input from businesses across the five boroughs.

Submit your ideas and recommendations by Friday, September 26 »

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!
About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?
HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later
Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.
The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.
The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.
The vaccine is safe!
Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.
Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!
The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.


Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!

About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?

HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later

  • Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
  • Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.

The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.

  • The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
  • Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
  • Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.

The vaccine is safe!

  • Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.

Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!

  • The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.

Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

Show us your favorite healthy fruits and vegetables by entering our #SoGoodNYC Facebook Photo Contest!
Text SOGOOD to 877877 to find a NYC farmers’ market near you.
Visit a market and snap a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable.
Enter your photo by Sept 2nd:


Facebook: Like our Eat Healthy, Be Active Facebook page and upload your photo to our contest page: bit.ly/XA5CEy

Twitter: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.
Instagram: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. Share your Instagram photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.
We’ll pick our top entry from each of the five boroughs, and you and everyone else can vote for your favorite citywide! 
Winners will have their photos posted at the farmers’ market where their photo was taken, and will receive a food-related incentive basket containing items such as a grater, spatula, t-shirt and/or tote bag!

Show us your favorite healthy fruits and vegetables by entering our #SoGoodNYC Facebook Photo Contest!

  1. Text SOGOOD to 877877 to find a NYC farmers’ market near you.
  2. Visit a market and snap a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable.
  3. Enter your photo by Sept 2nd:

Facebook: Like our Eat Healthy, Be Active Facebook page and upload your photo to our contest page: bit.ly/XA5CEy

Twitter: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.

Instagram: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. Share your Instagram photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.

We’ll pick our top entry from each of the five boroughs, and you and everyone else can vote for your favorite citywide!

Winners will have their photos posted at the farmers’ market where their photo was taken, and will receive a food-related incentive basket containing items such as a grater, spatula, t-shirt and/or tote bag!

Be Ready New York!
Bystanders have the potential to save lives and assist people after an emergency.
Our Bystander Training provides an overview of how to recognize a suspected explosive device and what to expect after an explosion occurs. The training also goes through specific steps a bystander can take when reporting suspicious activity, communicating with victims and first responders, identifying psychological trauma, and taking additional training that will prepare bystanders for emergencies. 

Take the interactive course! It takes approximately one hour to complete.

Be Ready New York!

Bystanders have the potential to save lives and assist people after an emergency.

Our Bystander Training provides an overview of how to recognize a suspected explosive device and what to expect after an explosion occurs. The training also goes through specific steps a bystander can take when reporting suspicious activity, communicating with victims and first responders, identifying psychological trauma, and taking additional training that will prepare bystanders for emergencies. 

Take the interactive course! It takes approximately one hour to complete.

nychealthyneighborhoods:

To kick off National Breastfeeding Monththe Brooklyn Breastfeeding Empowerment Zone along with Bedford-Stuyvesant Family Health Center WIC Program, and Council member Robert E. Cornegy hosted the Sixth Annual Breastfeeding Walk on August 1, 2014. 

The 2.3 mile walk throughout Bedford-Stuyvesant, was completed by 100 mothers, fathers, children and supporters alike, and achieved one of the Breastfeeding Empowerment Zone’s messages: to mobilize communities to provide local breastfeeding support and promotion. 

For more information about breastfeeding, please click here or call 311. 

pozmagazine:

POZ Tip: Keep your meds next to something you use on a daily basis to help you remember to take them each day. #adherence #hivmeds #poztip

Taking your medication is an important part of staying healthy!
To help prevent missing doses, text CARE to 877877 to join our text messaging service for HIV-positive New Yorkers.
The free service (standard text messaging rates apply) includes medication reminders, doctor appointment reminders, refill reminders, healthy messages, and information on health education workshops!

pozmagazine:

POZ Tip: Keep your meds next to something you use on a daily basis to help you remember to take them each day. #adherence #hivmeds #poztip

Taking your medication is an important part of staying healthy!

To help prevent missing doses, text CARE to 877877 to join our text messaging service for HIV-positive New Yorkers.

The free service (standard text messaging rates apply) includes medication reminders, doctor appointment reminders, refill reminders, healthy messages, and information on health education workshops!

Join us for the 1st Annual NYC Overdose Awareness Day!
On September 9, 2014, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene will host the 1st Annual NYC Overdose Awareness Day to raise awareness about opioid overdose and to commemorate those who have been lost.

1pm-2:15pm: Overdose prevention training. Overdose Rescue Kits with Naloxone (Narcan) will be dispensed.  Naloxone is a medication that reverses the effects of overdose and can save lives.

2:30pm-3:15pm: Presentation by the Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Use Prevention, Care and Treatment highlighting work currently being done to address the overdose crisis in NYC.

3:30pm-5pm: Panel discussion with individuals who have been impacted by overdose.

All events will take place in Room 3-32. Refreshments will be served.

Space is limited! For free registration, click here.

Join us for the 1st Annual NYC Overdose Awareness Day!

On September 9, 2014, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene will host the 1st Annual NYC Overdose Awareness Day to raise awareness about opioid overdose and to commemorate those who have been lost.

1pm-2:15pm: Overdose prevention training. Overdose Rescue Kits with Naloxone (Narcan) will be dispensed.  Naloxone is a medication that reverses the effects of overdose and can save lives.

2:30pm-3:15pm: Presentation by the Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Use Prevention, Care and Treatment highlighting work currently being done to address the overdose crisis in NYC.

3:30pm-5pm: Panel discussion with individuals who have been impacted by overdose.

All events will take place in Room 3-32. Refreshments will be served.

Space is limited! For free registration, click here.

After consultation with CDC and Mount Sinai, the Health Department has concluded that the patient is unlikely to have Ebola. Specimens are being tested for common causes of illness and to definitively exclude Ebola.

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Learn more about Ebola: http://on.nyc.gov/1ltQPjM

Today is World Hepatitis Day!
The Health Department, the Fund for Public Health in New York and five community partners – the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Cornell Medical College, VNSNY Choice and HealthFirst – announced today that they have received a $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to focus on hepatitis C (HCV).
Project INSPIRE NYC (Innovate & Network to Stop HCV & Prevent complications via Integrating care, Responding to needs and Engaging patients & providers) aims to achieve:
Better care, by increasing the number of patients starting hepatitis C therapy, strengthening management of behavioral health problems, reducing hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and maintaining a high level of satisfaction among enrollees;
Better health, with increased hepatitis C cure rates, fewer hepatitis C-related complications, and increased screening for depression and alcohol abuse; and
Lower costs, by reducing expenses from preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications of hepatitis C infection.



Hepatitis C Facts:
An estimated 146,500 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, though about half do not know that they are infected.
Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness.
Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C enters the blood stream of someone who is not infected. Today, people most often become infected with hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions.
Most people living with hepatitis C have few symptoms of illness until 10 to 30 years after initial infection, when life-threatening complications can develop. People with hepatitis C are at risk for developing cirrhosis, liver cancer, and other types of liver damage.
Given unprecedented advances in hepatitis C treatment, a cure has become achievable for most. Treatment is now shorter, less toxic, and more effective than in the past.




 NYC Health is releasing a number of new resources including an updated website and site locator, informational video, Risk Assessment postcard, Hep C Facts booklet, and a City Health Information Bulletin for primary care providers, as well as a mobile app. New Yorkers can also text LIVER to 877877 to be connected with Hepatitis C testing and care services.

Read our Press Release for more information and the full resource list.

Today is World Hepatitis Day!

The Health Department, the Fund for Public Health in New York and five community partners – the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Cornell Medical College, VNSNY Choice and HealthFirst – announced today that they have received a $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to focus on hepatitis C (HCV).

Project INSPIRE NYC (Innovate & Network to Stop HCV & Prevent complications via Integrating care, Responding to needs and Engaging patients & providers) aims to achieve:

  1. Better care, by increasing the number of patients starting hepatitis C therapy, strengthening management of behavioral health problems, reducing hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and maintaining a high level of satisfaction among enrollees;
  2. Better health, with increased hepatitis C cure rates, fewer hepatitis C-related complications, and increased screening for depression and alcohol abuse; and
  3. Lower costs, by reducing expenses from preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications of hepatitis C infection.

Hepatitis C Facts:

  • An estimated 146,500 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, though about half do not know that they are infected.
  • Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness.
  • Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C enters the blood stream of someone who is not infected. Today, people most often become infected with hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions.
  • Most people living with hepatitis C have few symptoms of illness until 10 to 30 years after initial infection, when life-threatening complications can develop. People with hepatitis C are at risk for developing cirrhosis, liver cancer, and other types of liver damage.
  • Given unprecedented advances in hepatitis C treatment, a cure has become achievable for most. Treatment is now shorter, less toxic, and more effective than in the past.


NYC Health is releasing a number of new resources including an updated website and site locator, informational video, Risk Assessment postcard, Hep C Facts booklet, and a City Health Information Bulletin for primary care providers, as well as a mobile app. New Yorkers can also text LIVER to 877877 to be connected with Hepatitis C testing and care services.

Read our Press Release for more information and the full resource list.

The Brooklyn DPHO along with the NYC Department of Transportation and community groups in North and Central Brooklyn have collaborated to study and promote active transportation (walking and biking) in their neighborhoods. In a recent NYC Health Department study (discussed in the NY1 report above), results show that bike lanes in low-income communities are being used by residents and may help improve neighborhood health.

Click HERE to read the results of the study of bike lane use in low-income urban neighborhoods. 

For more information about biking in NYC, please click here.

Find out how NYC Health’s Brooklyn District Public Health Office (DPHO) is working to bring physical activity to low-income neighborhoods.

To keep up-to-date on the community work of our three DPHOs, serving Harlem, Brooklyn and the Bronx, follow their NYC Healthy Neighborhoods Tumblr page!