Today is World Hepatitis Day!
The Health Department, the Fund for Public Health in New York and five community partners – the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Cornell Medical College, VNSNY Choice and HealthFirst – announced today that they have received a $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to focus on hepatitis C (HCV).
Project INSPIRE NYC (Innovate & Network to Stop HCV & Prevent complications via Integrating care, Responding to needs and Engaging patients & providers) aims to achieve:
Better care, by increasing the number of patients starting hepatitis C therapy, strengthening management of behavioral health problems, reducing hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and maintaining a high level of satisfaction among enrollees;
Better health, with increased hepatitis C cure rates, fewer hepatitis C-related complications, and increased screening for depression and alcohol abuse; and
Lower costs, by reducing expenses from preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications of hepatitis C infection.



Hepatitis C Facts:
An estimated 146,500 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, though about half do not know that they are infected.
Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness.
Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C enters the blood stream of someone who is not infected. Today, people most often become infected with hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions.
Most people living with hepatitis C have few symptoms of illness until 10 to 30 years after initial infection, when life-threatening complications can develop. People with hepatitis C are at risk for developing cirrhosis, liver cancer, and other types of liver damage.
Given unprecedented advances in hepatitis C treatment, a cure has become achievable for most. Treatment is now shorter, less toxic, and more effective than in the past.




 NYC Health is releasing a number of new resources including an updated website and site locator, informational video, Risk Assessment postcard, Hep C Facts booklet, and a City Health Information Bulletin for primary care providers, as well as a mobile app. New Yorkers can also text LIVER to 877877 to be connected with Hepatitis C testing and care services.

Read our Press Release for more information and the full resource list.

Today is World Hepatitis Day!

The Health Department, the Fund for Public Health in New York and five community partners – the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Cornell Medical College, VNSNY Choice and HealthFirst – announced today that they have received a $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to focus on hepatitis C (HCV).

Project INSPIRE NYC (Innovate & Network to Stop HCV & Prevent complications via Integrating care, Responding to needs and Engaging patients & providers) aims to achieve:

  1. Better care, by increasing the number of patients starting hepatitis C therapy, strengthening management of behavioral health problems, reducing hospitalizations and emergency department visits, and maintaining a high level of satisfaction among enrollees;
  2. Better health, with increased hepatitis C cure rates, fewer hepatitis C-related complications, and increased screening for depression and alcohol abuse; and
  3. Lower costs, by reducing expenses from preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications of hepatitis C infection.

Hepatitis C Facts:

  • An estimated 146,500 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, though about half do not know that they are infected.
  • Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness.
  • Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C enters the blood stream of someone who is not infected. Today, people most often become infected with hepatitis C by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions.
  • Most people living with hepatitis C have few symptoms of illness until 10 to 30 years after initial infection, when life-threatening complications can develop. People with hepatitis C are at risk for developing cirrhosis, liver cancer, and other types of liver damage.
  • Given unprecedented advances in hepatitis C treatment, a cure has become achievable for most. Treatment is now shorter, less toxic, and more effective than in the past.


NYC Health is releasing a number of new resources including an updated website and site locator, informational video, Risk Assessment postcard, Hep C Facts booklet, and a City Health Information Bulletin for primary care providers, as well as a mobile app. New Yorkers can also text LIVER to 877877 to be connected with Hepatitis C testing and care services.

Read our Press Release for more information and the full resource list.

The Brooklyn DPHO along with the NYC Department of Transportation and community groups in North and Central Brooklyn have collaborated to study and promote active transportation (walking and biking) in their neighborhoods. In a recent NYC Health Department study (discussed in the NY1 report above), results show that bike lanes in low-income communities are being used by residents and may help improve neighborhood health.

Click HERE to read the results of the study of bike lane use in low-income urban neighborhoods. 

For more information about biking in NYC, please click here.

Find out how NYC Health’s Brooklyn District Public Health Office (DPHO) is working to bring physical activity to low-income neighborhoods.

To keep up-to-date on the community work of our three DPHOs, serving Harlem, Brooklyn and the Bronx, follow their NYC Healthy Neighborhoods Tumblr page!

NYC Play Streets season is underway!

Each summer, quieter neighborhood blocks in NYC become car-free zones. These streets provide children and communities with a safe outdoor space for engaging in active play and physical activity! Every Play Street location is made possible by a local community organization.

Bring your family to one of the Play Streets below today!

 

Brooklyn

Irving Place/Fulton St. & Putnam Ave. on Monday-Friday 8A-5P thru 9/5

Moffat/Knickerbocker Ave & Wilson Ave. on Monday-Friday 9A-5P thru 8/29

Christopher St./Sutter Ave. & Belmont Ave. on Monday-Friday 9A-5P thru 8/29

Jerome St./Liberty Ave & Atlantic Ave Monday-Friday 8A-5P thru 8/29

 

Bronx

Kingsbridge Terrace/Summit Pl. & Perot St. on Fridays 10A-2P thru 8/22

Jennings St./Prospect Avenue/ & Chislom Street on Monday-Friday 9A-5P thru 8/29

 

Manhattan

170th St/ Ft. Washington & Haven Avenue on Tuesdays 10:30A-3:30P through 8/12

Pinehurst/179th St. and 180th St on Wednesdays 10:30A-3:30P thru 8/13

Hamilton Pl. West  136th St. & West 138th on Tuesdays  10A-2P thru 8/26

101st Street between Lexington Ave. & Park Ave on Monday- Friday 8A-5P thru 8/22

 

Queens

Shore Avenue/Remington St. & Pinegrove St. on Wednesdays 10A-4P thru 8/27

90th Avenue/191st & 192nd St. on Monday-Friday 9A-3P thru 8/29

Shore Avenue/Remington St. & Pinegrove St. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays thru 8/29

 

Learn more about Play Streets and find out how your community can apply for a Play Street location.

Are you pouring on the pounds?
Americans today consume 200 to 300 more calories daily than 30 years ago. Nearly half of these extra calories come from sugary drinks and can lead to obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases.
For healthy alternatives, visit our Sugary Drinks page or call 311 for your Healthy Eating Packet. Don’t forget you can also join our Eat Healthy, Be Active NYC page on Facebook for daily tips and events around the City!
pubhealth:

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

Are you pouring on the pounds?

Americans today consume 200 to 300 more calories daily than 30 years ago. Nearly half of these extra calories come from sugary drinks and can lead to obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

For healthy alternatives, visit our Sugary Drinks page or call 311 for your Healthy Eating Packet. Don’t forget you can also join our Eat Healthy, Be Active NYC page on Facebook for daily tips and events around the City!

pubhealth:

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

Get Health Bucks!
There are a few ways for you to get Health Bucks to use on fresh fruits and vegetables at our farmers’ markets:

1. Shop at a farmers’ market using your EBT card – for every $5 you spend using EBT, you’ll receive a $2 Health Buck!
Find out which markets accept EBT. Most do! And those that don’t are noted on our map.
Visit the market information tent and look for the market manager .
Tell the market manager how much you plan to spend using your SNAP benefits.
Swipe your EBT card to purchase as many wooden tokens as you’ll need (most markets use tokens for EBT, credit or debit purchases). These tokens act like cash at the market, can be spent at the farmers’ tables and never expire. (Remember: you will receive one $2 Health Buck for every $5 you spend in EBT.)



2. Participate in an activity at a community-based organization that distributes Health Bucks.
3. Attend a free nutrition and cooking demonstration or food workshop for kids. You’ll also receive free tastings, as well as nutrition and recipe handouts in addition to the Health Buck.
Look for the carrot and apple icons on our map to find participating markets.

Redeem your Health Bucks (at any market)!
1. Go to your local farmers’ market.
2. Find items that you would like to purchase.
3. Give the farmer your $2 Health Buck as payment for your fresh fruits and vegetables!

Get Health Bucks!

There are a few ways for you to get Health Bucks to use on fresh fruits and vegetables at our farmers’ markets:

1. Shop at a farmers’ market using your EBT card – for every $5 you spend using EBT, you’ll receive a $2 Health Buck!

  • Find out which markets accept EBT. Most do! And those that don’t are noted on our map.
  • Visit the market information tent and look for the market manager .
  • Tell the market manager how much you plan to spend using your SNAP benefits.
  • Swipe your EBT card to purchase as many wooden tokens as you’ll need (most markets use tokens for EBT, credit or debit purchases). These tokens act like cash at the market, can be spent at the farmers’ tables and never expire. (Remember: you will receive one $2 Health Buck for every $5 you spend in EBT.)

2. Participate in an activity at a community-based organization that distributes Health Bucks.

3. Attend a free nutrition and cooking demonstration or food workshop for kids. You’ll also receive free tastings, as well as nutrition and recipe handouts in addition to the Health Buck.

  • Look for the carrot and apple icons on our map to find participating markets.

Redeem your Health Bucks (at any market)!

1. Go to your local farmers’ market.

2. Find items that you would like to purchase.

3. Give the farmer your $2 Health Buck as payment for your fresh fruits and vegetables!

nycedc:

It’s Paid Sick Leave Day.
Employees covered by NYC’s new Paid Sick Leave law will be able to begin using accrued leave on July 30, 2014.
Under the law, certain employers now must provide sick leave so employees can care for themselves or a family member.
Know your rights and responsibilities, find more information from New York City Department of Consumer Affairs here.

nycedc:

It’s Paid Sick Leave Day.

Employees covered by NYC’s new Paid Sick Leave law will be able to begin using accrued leave on July 30, 2014.

Under the law, certain employers now must provide sick leave so employees can care for themselves or a family member.

Know your rights and responsibilities, find more information from New York City Department of Consumer Affairs here.

Check out one great way for kids to stay active during the summer! Open to NYC middle school students ages 11 through 13.
nycgov:

Many memories are made during summer, and DYCD Youth Connect's Summer Enrichment program is just the place to make them! Enrollment for summer programs are available until August 29, 2014. Visit:http://nyc.gov/summer

Check out one great way for kids to stay active during the summer! Open to NYC middle school students ages 11 through 13.

nycgov:

Many memories are made during summer, and DYCD Youth Connect's Summer Enrichment program is just the place to make them! Enrollment for summer programs are available until August 29, 2014. Visit:http://nyc.gov/summer

For this first time this season, NYC Health has detected West Nile Virus in New York City mosquitoes from areas in Queens and Staten Island. No human cases have been reported this season.
New Yorkers are urged to take precautions to prevent exposure to mosquito bites. Some helpful tips:
Use an approved insect repellent containing picaridin, DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus (not for children under three), or products that contain the active ingredient IR3535.
Make sure windows have screens and repair or replace screens that have tears or holes.
Eliminate any standing water from your property and dispose of containers that can collect water. Standing water is a violation of the New York City Health Code.
Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.
Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs. Keep them empty or covered if not in use; drain water that collects in pool covers.
Report standing water by calling 311 or visiting here.






The Health Department will also apply larvicide by helicopter to marsh and other non-residential areas of Staten Island, the Bronx and Queens on select days July 17-21.
Visit our website to view the continuously updated West Nile Spray & Aerial Larviciding Schedule, track West Nile virus reports and results, and review NYC’s 2014 Comprehensive Mosquito Plan.

For this first time this season, NYC Health has detected West Nile Virus in New York City mosquitoes from areas in Queens and Staten Island. No human cases have been reported this season.

New Yorkers are urged to take precautions to prevent exposure to mosquito bites. Some helpful tips:

  • Use an approved insect repellent containing picaridin, DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus (not for children under three), or products that contain the active ingredient IR3535.
  • Make sure windows have screens and repair or replace screens that have tears or holes.
  • Eliminate any standing water from your property and dispose of containers that can collect water. Standing water is a violation of the New York City Health Code.
  • Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.
  • Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs. Keep them empty or covered if not in use; drain water that collects in pool covers.
  • Report standing water by calling 311 or visiting here.

The Health Department will also apply larvicide by helicopter to marsh and other non-residential areas of Staten Island, the Bronx and Queens on select days July 17-21.

Visit our website to view the continuously updated West Nile Spray & Aerial Larviciding Schedule, track West Nile virus reports and results, and review NYC’s 2014 Comprehensive Mosquito Plan.

It’s Throwback Thursday! Check out New Yorkers lining up for small pox vaccinations in Brooklyn circa 1948.
These days, you can visit one of our vaccination walk-in clinics for a wide variety of vaccines recommended for children, teens, and adults.

It’s Throwback Thursday! Check out New Yorkers lining up for small pox vaccinations in Brooklyn circa 1948.

These days, you can visit one of our vaccination walk-in clinics for a wide variety of vaccines recommended for children, teens, and adults.

The 2014 NYC Farmers’ Market Map is Out!

Visit a farmers’ market today and bring home fresh fruits and vegetables while supporting your local farmers and growers!

Get a snapshot of all our NYC farmers’ markets all in one map, or check out our maps for Brooklyn, Bronx, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island!

Did you know you could use your SNAP benefits at almost any of our farmers’ markets? You can also receive Health Bucks to get extra savings on foods you purchase with your benefits!

Visit our Farmers’ Market page for all you need to know eat healthier this summer and year-round!