Dance4Demand in Support of Female Condoms!
Tuesday, September 16, 2014, marks the third annual Global Female Condom Day (GFCD) — a day of education and advocacy dedicated to increasing awareness, accessibility and use of female condoms worldwide. Individuals and organizations are advancing the global movement for female condoms by participating in this international day of action. GFCD is a collaborative effort between the National Female Condom Coalition (NFCC) and the Universal Access for Female Condoms (UAFC) Joint Programme. For more information, visit FemaleCondomDay.org. Connect with GFCD social media through #Dance4Demand, #GFCD2014, and #femalecondoms.
Sexual and reproductive health advocates in New York City, and around the world, will Dance4Demand this GFCD to call for the increased demand of this vital health product. Today, NYC Health will work with several community-based organizations, throughout the five boroughs of New York City, to highlight this highly effective sexual health tool. Lifebeat, a leading national nonprofit dedicated to educating America’s youth about HIV prevention, will be promoting the Health Department’s NYC Condom Availability Program (NYCAP) and GFCD at their events.

 
FC2 in NYC
NYC Health has been distributing female condoms (also known as FC2s) since 1998.  In 2013, we distributed 1.3 million FC2s through thousands of condom distribution partners across the city.  A recent NYC Health evaluation found that while awareness of the FC2 was high, use was low among all populations.  Only 1 out of every 5 survey respondents reported ever using a FC2— a statistic we will continue to work hard to increase.  A first step to increasing FC2 acceptance and use will be Dancing4Demand on Global Female Condom Day.    Women and men in NYC and across the globe will be dancing in parks, at community centers, schools, clinics and even the offices of public officials to clearly and categorically show their demand for the FC2. 
The NYC Condom Availability Program will be at the following locations Dancing 4 Demand!


 
Monday September 15th, 2014
Manhattan: Lifebeat at Irving Plaza 6-8PM

 
Tuesday September 16th, 2014
Bronx: BOOM! Health at Fordham Road and Grand Concourse (overpass) 10AM-2PM
Brooklyn: CAMBA at 885 Flatbush Ave 12-4PM
Manhattan: Washington Heights Corner Project at 181st & St. Nicholas 11AM-3PM
Lifebeat at Times Square 1-3PM                                
Queens: Queens Pride House at 76-19 Roosevelt Ave 2-6PM

Staten Island: CHASI at 166 Port Richmond Ave 8AM-12PM

Dance4Demand in Support of Female Condoms!

Tuesday, September 16, 2014, marks the third annual Global Female Condom Day (GFCD) — a day of education and advocacy dedicated to increasing awareness, accessibility and use of female condoms worldwide. Individuals and organizations are advancing the global movement for female condoms by participating in this international day of action. GFCD is a collaborative effort between the National Female Condom Coalition (NFCC) and the Universal Access for Female Condoms (UAFC) Joint Programme. For more information, visit FemaleCondomDay.org. Connect with GFCD social media through #Dance4Demand, #GFCD2014, and #femalecondoms.

Sexual and reproductive health advocates in New York City, and around the world, will Dance4Demand this GFCD to call for the increased demand of this vital health product. Today, NYC Health will work with several community-based organizations, throughout the five boroughs of New York City, to highlight this highly effective sexual health tool. Lifebeat, a leading national nonprofit dedicated to educating America’s youth about HIV prevention, will be promoting the Health Department’s NYC Condom Availability Program (NYCAP) and GFCD at their events.

 

FC2 in NYC

NYC Health has been distributing female condoms (also known as FC2s) since 1998.  In 2013, we distributed 1.3 million FC2s through thousands of condom distribution partners across the city.  A recent NYC Health evaluation found that while awareness of the FC2 was high, use was low among all populations.  Only 1 out of every 5 survey respondents reported ever using a FC2— a statistic we will continue to work hard to increase.  A first step to increasing FC2 acceptance and use will be Dancing4Demand on Global Female Condom Day.    Women and men in NYC and across the globe will be dancing in parks, at community centers, schools, clinics and even the offices of public officials to clearly and categorically show their demand for the FC2.

The NYC Condom Availability Program will be at the following locations Dancing 4 Demand!

 

Monday September 15th, 2014

Manhattan: Lifebeat at Irving Plaza 6-8PM

 

Tuesday September 16th, 2014

Bronx: BOOM! Health at Fordham Road and Grand Concourse (overpass) 10AM-2PM

Brooklyn: CAMBA at 885 Flatbush Ave 12-4PM

Manhattan: Washington Heights Corner Project at 181st & St. Nicholas 11AM-3PM

Lifebeat at Times Square 1-3PM                               

Queens: Queens Pride House at 76-19 Roosevelt Ave 2-6PM

Staten Island: CHASI at 166 Port Richmond Ave 8AM-12PM

NYC Health is currently investigating three new meningitis cases in NYC among men who have sex with men.

What is meningococcal disease (often referred to as meningitis)?
Meningococcal disease is a severe bacterial infection that has a high fatality rate. A previous meningococcal outbreak among men who have sex with men in NYC ended in February 2013 after 22 cases were reported, including 7 fatal cases. Twelve of the 22 cases were HIV-infected.
What is the difference between meningitis and meningococcal disease?

These two terms are often used interchangeably, but meningococcal disease is the proper clinical term for the bacterial infection that affected these cases. Meningitis, meaning swelling of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, is a common outcome of meningococcal infection.  
How is meningitis spread?

This disease is spread by prolonged close contact with nose or throat discharges from an infected person. Examples of prolonged contact include living in the same household, sharing cigarettes, or intimate activities, including kissing and sexual contact.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms include fever, chill, severe muscle or abdominal pain, headache, vomiting, stiff neck and a rash, and usually occur within five days of exposure. If you think you may have been exposed and develop any of these symptoms, seek medical care immediately.
 How can I protect myself?
The Health Department recommends meningococcal vaccination for all men who have sex with men, regardless of HIV status, who regularly have intimate contact with other men met through a website, hookup/dating apps, or at a bar or party.
Why are you targeting this population?

Everyone is susceptible to meningococcal infection, but for unknown reasons this particular strain is only affecting men who have sex with men. The Health Dept. is working to gather more information and to understand why men who have sex with men are at risk.   
Where to get vaccinated?
Ask your provider about the meningococcal vaccine. The vaccine is also available at many pharmacies, including all NYC Duane Reade and Walgreens locations. These locations accept most insurance, including Medicaid.

No insurance? Vaccinations are also available at Health Dept. clinics. Clinics locations below:

Manhattanville Renaissance 21 Old Broadway (at 126th St.) 10027. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

Central Harlem 2238 5th Ave (at 137th St.) 10037. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3:30P.

Morrisania 1309 Fulton Ave (at E 169th St.) 10456. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3P.

Fort Greene 295 Flatbush Ave, 2nd Fl. 11201. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

Crown Heights 1218 1218 Prospect Pl 11213. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

Corona 34-33 Junction Blvd 11372. Hours are Tue & Fri 8:30A-3P.

Jamaica 90-37 Parsons Blvd 11432. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

 

You can also text VAXALERT to 877877 to search for vaccine locations near you. Learn more about meningitis in our FAQ. 

NYC Health is currently investigating three new meningitis cases in NYC among men who have sex with men.

What is meningococcal disease (often referred to as meningitis)?

Meningococcal disease is a severe bacterial infection that has a high fatality rate. A previous meningococcal outbreak among men who have sex with men in NYC ended in February 2013 after 22 cases were reported, including 7 fatal cases. Twelve of the 22 cases were HIV-infected.

What is the difference between meningitis and meningococcal disease?

These two terms are often used interchangeably, but meningococcal disease is the proper clinical term for the bacterial infection that affected these cases. Meningitis, meaning swelling of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, is a common outcome of meningococcal infection.  

How is meningitis spread?

This disease is spread by prolonged close contact with nose or throat discharges from an infected person. Examples of prolonged contact include living in the same household, sharing cigarettes, or intimate activities, including kissing and sexual contact.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms include fever, chill, severe muscle or abdominal pain, headache, vomiting, stiff neck and a rash, and usually occur within five days of exposure. If you think you may have been exposed and develop any of these symptoms, seek medical care immediately.

 How can I protect myself?

The Health Department recommends meningococcal vaccination for all men who have sex with men, regardless of HIV status, who regularly have intimate contact with other men met through a website, hookup/dating apps, or at a bar or party.

Why are you targeting this population?

Everyone is susceptible to meningococcal infection, but for unknown reasons this particular strain is only affecting men who have sex with men. The Health Dept. is working to gather more information and to understand why men who have sex with men are at risk.   

Where to get vaccinated?

Ask your provider about the meningococcal vaccine. The vaccine is also available at many pharmacies, including all NYC Duane Reade and Walgreens locations. These locations accept most insurance, including Medicaid.

No insurance? Vaccinations are also available at Health Dept. clinics. Clinics locations below:

Manhattanville Renaissance 21 Old Broadway (at 126th St.) 10027. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

Central Harlem 2238 5th Ave (at 137th St.) 10037. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3:30P.

Morrisania 1309 Fulton Ave (at E 169th St.) 10456. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3P.

Fort Greene 295 Flatbush Ave, 2nd Fl. 11201. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

Crown Heights 1218 1218 Prospect Pl 11213. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

Corona 34-33 Junction Blvd 11372. Hours are Tue & Fri 8:30A-3P.

Jamaica 90-37 Parsons Blvd 11432. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

 

You can also text VAXALERT to 877877 to search for vaccine locations near you. Learn more about meningitis in our FAQ

Today is the first ever NYC Overdose Awareness Day!

Mayor Bill de Blasio issued a proclamation declaring September 9, 2014 New York City Overdose Awareness Day.

As part of the events, NYC Health held a public training event on overdose prevention where we raised awareness about opioid overdose and distributed 200 doses of naloxone.

According to a new Health Department report, 77% of  NYC’s drug overdose deaths in 2013 involved an opioid, including opioid analgesics (prescription painkillers), methadone, or heroin. On average, there is more than one fatal opioid overdose a day in New York City.

Since 2010, more than 25,000 naloxone kits have been distributed and at least 500 overdoses in New York City have been reversed by using naloxone. In addition to distributing naloxone, NYC Health promotes access to treatment for opioid addiction, including medication assisted treatment through buprenorphine and methadone.

Thank you to everyone who participated in today’s events! To find out where you can get an overdose rescue kit with naloxone, call 311 and ask for “overdose prevention.”

You can also visit our website to learn more about overdose prevention. To connect with free, confidential 24/7 help and support to stop using, call 1-800-LIFENET (800-543-3638) or 311.

Harlem residents!
Sign up to receive your $10 Food Box, filled with fresh, local fruits and vegetables, at the Union Johnson Early Learning Center!

nychealthyneighborhoods:

Attention Harlem residents! NYC Health has partnered with GrowNYC to bring their Food Box to the Union Johnson Early Learning Center located at 1829 Lexington Ave.
Every Tuesday, GrowNYC delivers $10 boxes of farm fresh food to the early learning center. The photo above shows some of the items you can get in your fresh food box!
Parents, caregivers, and community members can sign up at Union Johnson Preschool. Those who sign up will pay for the box one week before they pick up their delicious box of seasonal fruits and veggies. 
Also, EBT and Health Bucks can be used to purchase the food box! Cash, credit, and debit are also accepted. 
For more information about the Food Box program, email ntucker@grownyc.org or call 212-788-3581.

Harlem residents!

Sign up to receive your $10 Food Box, filled with fresh, local fruits and vegetables, at the Union Johnson Early Learning Center!

nychealthyneighborhoods:

Attention Harlem residents! NYC Health has partnered with GrowNYC to bring their Food Box to the Union Johnson Early Learning Center located at 1829 Lexington Ave.

Every Tuesday, GrowNYC delivers $10 boxes of farm fresh food to the early learning center. The photo above shows some of the items you can get in your fresh food box!

Parents, caregivers, and community members can sign up at Union Johnson Preschool. Those who sign up will pay for the box one week before they pick up their delicious box of seasonal fruits and veggies. 

Also, EBT and Health Bucks can be used to purchase the food box! Cash, credit, and debit are also accepted. 

For more information about the Food Box program, email ntucker@grownyc.org or call 212-788-3581.

The Health Department is currently investigating a cluster of invasive meningococcal disease - commonly known as meningitis - among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Three cases of meningitis have occurred in Brooklyn and Queens since August 24, with the last two cases reported in the last three days. Meningitis is a severe bacterial infection that has a high fatality rate. A previous outbreak of meningococcal disease among men who have sex with men ended in February 2013 after 22 cases were reported, including seven fatal cases.

Text VAXALERT to 877877 for meningitis vaccine information and updates.

Let’s stop HIV in New York City

  • If you are HIV-negative, PEP and PrEP can help you stay that way.
  • If you are HIV-positive, PEP and PrEP can help protect your partners.

 

Daily PrEP

PrEP is a daily pill that can help keep you HIV-negative as long as you take it every day.

  • Ask your doctor if PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) may be right for you.
  • Condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.

 

Emergency PEP

If you are HIV-negative and think you were exposed to HIV, immediately go to a clinic or emergency room and ask for PEP (Post-exposure  Prophylaxis).

  • PEP can stop HIV if started within 36 hours of exposure.
  • You continue taking PEP for 28 days.

Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PEP and PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured. Visit NYC Health’s website to find out where to get PrEP or PEP in New York City.

Submit your ideas for how to improve and simplify interactions between small businesses and government in NYC by 9/26!
nycbizsolutions:

Last month, the de Blasio Administration announced Small Business First, a new initiative led by the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations. In coordination with multiple City agencies, this initiative seeks to simplify the City’s regulatory climate and make it easier for businesses to interact with government. Building upon previous reforms, the initiative seeks to make changes that will assist businesses by:
Providing better information about government requirements and how to comply
Simplifying rules and compliance processes to reduce violations
Ensuring enforcement focuses on promoting compliance through education and flexibility
Easing the process for correction and adjudication of violations
Engaging underserved communities to better deliver services
Mayor de Blasio has tasked the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations with developing recommendations by working with City agencies, community stakeholders and soliciting input from businesses across the five boroughs.
Submit your ideas and recommendations by Friday, September 26 »

Submit your ideas for how to improve and simplify interactions between small businesses and government in NYC by 9/26!

nycbizsolutions:

Last month, the de Blasio Administration announced Small Business First, a new initiative led by the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations. In coordination with multiple City agencies, this initiative seeks to simplify the City’s regulatory climate and make it easier for businesses to interact with government. Building upon previous reforms, the initiative seeks to make changes that will assist businesses by:

  • Providing better information about government requirements and how to comply
  • Simplifying rules and compliance processes to reduce violations
  • Ensuring enforcement focuses on promoting compliance through education and flexibility
  • Easing the process for correction and adjudication of violations
  • Engaging underserved communities to better deliver services

Mayor de Blasio has tasked the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Mayor’s Office of Operations with developing recommendations by working with City agencies, community stakeholders and soliciting input from businesses across the five boroughs.

Submit your ideas and recommendations by Friday, September 26 »

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!
About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?
HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later
Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.
The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.
The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.
The vaccine is safe!
Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.
Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!
The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.


Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

Prevent Cancer Today: #VaccinateHPV!

About 79 million people in the U.S. have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and another 14 million get HPV each year.  Who should get vaccinated and why?

HPV infection can cause genital warts and can lead to cancer many years later

  • Each year, there are approximately 33,200 HPV-associated cancers in the U.S. – about 20,600 in women and 12,600 in men. HPV cancers include cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.
  • Early vaccination and prevention is critical for cancer prevention, which is why it is especially important for parents to take control and bring their pre-teens and teens to the doctor to receive the vaccine.

The best way to prevent HPV is with a vaccine, which may be up to 99% effective in preventing these cancers.

  • The vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12. It is important to vaccinate your child now, before he or she is old enough to be exposed to HPV. The vaccine may be given to pre-teens as young as 9.
  • Females aged 13 through 26 and males aged 13 through 21 should be vaccinated if they have not previously received the vaccine.
  • Men who have sex with men, who are at greater risk for HPV infection, and men with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS) aged 22 through 26 should also receive the HPV vaccine.

The vaccine is safe!

  • Nearly 67 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given in the U.S. through March 2014, and studies provide continued evidence of the vaccine’s safety. The most common side-effects are mild, temporary symptoms, including soreness where the shot was given and fever, headache and nausea.

Save yourself an additional trip to the doctor!

  • The HPV vaccine is safe to receive with the other recommended adolescent vaccines. Many children also see health care professionals for physicals before school or for participation in sports, camping events, travel and so on. These are all great opportunities for your preteen or teen to get the HPV vaccine.

Visit our HPV page to learn more & ask your child’s provider about the HPV vaccine today!

Show us your favorite healthy fruits and vegetables by entering our #SoGoodNYC Facebook Photo Contest!
Text SOGOOD to 877877 to find a NYC farmers’ market near you.
Visit a market and snap a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable.
Enter your photo by Sept 2nd:


Facebook: Like our Eat Healthy, Be Active Facebook page and upload your photo to our contest page: bit.ly/XA5CEy

Twitter: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.
Instagram: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. Share your Instagram photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.
We’ll pick our top entry from each of the five boroughs, and you and everyone else can vote for your favorite citywide! 
Winners will have their photos posted at the farmers’ market where their photo was taken, and will receive a food-related incentive basket containing items such as a grater, spatula, t-shirt and/or tote bag!

Show us your favorite healthy fruits and vegetables by entering our #SoGoodNYC Facebook Photo Contest!

  1. Text SOGOOD to 877877 to find a NYC farmers’ market near you.
  2. Visit a market and snap a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable.
  3. Enter your photo by Sept 2nd:

Facebook: Like our Eat Healthy, Be Active Facebook page and upload your photo to our contest page: bit.ly/XA5CEy

Twitter: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.

Instagram: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. Share your Instagram photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.

We’ll pick our top entry from each of the five boroughs, and you and everyone else can vote for your favorite citywide!

Winners will have their photos posted at the farmers’ market where their photo was taken, and will receive a food-related incentive basket containing items such as a grater, spatula, t-shirt and/or tote bag!

Be Ready New York!
Bystanders have the potential to save lives and assist people after an emergency.
Our Bystander Training provides an overview of how to recognize a suspected explosive device and what to expect after an explosion occurs. The training also goes through specific steps a bystander can take when reporting suspicious activity, communicating with victims and first responders, identifying psychological trauma, and taking additional training that will prepare bystanders for emergencies. 

Take the interactive course! It takes approximately one hour to complete.

Be Ready New York!

Bystanders have the potential to save lives and assist people after an emergency.

Our Bystander Training provides an overview of how to recognize a suspected explosive device and what to expect after an explosion occurs. The training also goes through specific steps a bystander can take when reporting suspicious activity, communicating with victims and first responders, identifying psychological trauma, and taking additional training that will prepare bystanders for emergencies. 

Take the interactive course! It takes approximately one hour to complete.